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PLEASE NOTE: Due to the recent effects of the COVID-19, we are offering clients and prospective clients the ability to meet with us via in-person, telephone and/or video conferencing. It is important to us to continue to assist you in any way we can. Please do not hesitate to call our office and let our family help yours.

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Naples, Florida

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Just what is the speed limit?

One of the more common causes of car accidents in Naples is speeding. If the person that caused your accident was obviously speeding, you may view assigning liability to a simple matter. Yet accusations of speeding are often met with exclamations that a driver was unfamiliar with the area and thus not aware of the posted speed limit. Such an excuse can often be answered by turning to the implied speed limits stipulated by the state’s government. 

Per the Florida Drivers Association, the state has set standards for speed limits in certain areas. If speed limits are not posted, drivers should default to these standards in order to be considered to be operating their vehicles as reasonable speeds. These standards may also help one stay within the posted speed limits even if a driver does not know them (as the standard speed limits typically will on vary from those posted in unique circumstances). 

The standard speed limits in the state (and the areas that apply to) are as follows: 

  • School zones: 20 mph
  • Municipal speed areas as well as business and residential areas: 30 mph
  • Rural interstates and limited access highways: 70 mph
  • All other roads and highways: 55 mph

Keep in mind that simply because a speed limit is posted in an area does not always mean that driver cannot be considered to have been speeding as long as they were traveling at a speed lower than it. Both the standard and posted speed limits are those that authorities view as being the maximum speeds at which a driver can operate their vehicle safely. If the driver that hit you was traveling at speeds that might be considered excessive given the road conditions at the time, it might also be determined that they were speeding. 

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