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Home » Car Accidents » Self-driving cars may not eradicate accidents

Self-driving cars may not eradicate accidents

Residents in Florida may likely be curious about the numerous reports detailing the advances in and testing of fully self-driving cars happening in various locations around the nation. As The Washington Post notes, some statistics indicate that a whopping 94 percent of all motor vehicle accidents today are influenced by or caused by human error. While it would stand to reason then than autonomous vehicles could eliminate all crashes, that may not necessarily be possible.

One of the issues that may impede the eradication of or even the reduction of car crashes is getting the average consumer comfortable enough with self-driving cars so that they will readily adopt and use them. Car and Driver magazine explains that this is not likely to be an easy task. By nature, becoming a passenger in an autonomous vehicle means that a person must give up control of the vehicle. In addition, they are ceding their control not to another person but to a computer.

Research has shown that human beings associate some level of control with a corresponding level of safety. This means that many people may connect giving up control with being less safe, thereby reducing their willingness to ride in a fully autonomous car.

Another problem plaguing the budding self-driving car industry is the current lack of regulations or standards about what defines a safe vehicle. This may well leave individual car manufacturers or technology companies to determine their own set of standards on what is safe and then consumers must determine if they are willing to trust that or not.

 

 

 

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